It's not how much you make, it's how much money you keep in your pocket.

Bob's Money Mojo

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Do you remember that feeling when you first learned to ride a bike on your own, or learned to whistle?  It took hours, days, and weeks of practice. When I did errands with Dad after school, I’d be creating weird squawks as I pursed my lips and blew while dangling my feet in waiting room chairs, while swishing my arms at his side at a checkout counter, and occasionally for brief stops just hanging out in the front seat of the car.

My parents had friends down the street from our school and we’d go over there some afternoons.  I had been practicing on my bike for weeks and weeks and was so frustrated.  Dad convinced me to try it again as he held onto the back of my bike.  I pedaled earnestly as I felt the sun come and go on my shoulders as I rode under the spotty spring tree leaves.

I was starting to enjoy the slight breeze on my face as I gained speed.  Then, a voice in the distance boomed out, “You’re doing it on your own!”  The rush and tingle came up from my gut into my shoulders as I beamed with pride.  Then, of course, I lost my focus and promptly fell over onto the pavement.

But after that, I could pedal on my own every time I climbed on the bike and I became stronger and more adept.  Nothing could stop me because I kept on trying.  Working with money and numbers doesn’t come easy to most people.  Yet, if you keep practicing, you’ll be able to manage your money as effectively as you ride your bicycle built for two and whistle at the same time.

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